Artists

Musicians


Terian Mack – Volume #1

In short, TERIAN MACK is extremely unique, energetic, and vibrant. in 2015 MACK was featured on TheSource.com and then went on tour in the summer of that year. In 2016 Terian started working with The Heatmakerz (credits: Kanye West, Lil Wayne, Nicki Minaj, and Fat Joe to name a few). In 2017 he began working in Jungle City Studios(NYC) on his EP, BABYLON THE GREAT. Jungle City has recorded recent albums for some of the most elite artist like Jay-Z, Beyonce, and Kanye. To Taylor Swift, Rihanna, and Justin Bieber.

Check out Terian’s music on SPOTIFY or INSTAGRAM.


Hadassah – Volume #2

Hadassah makes music that moves you. That movement could be anywhere from physical to spiritual, but with a voice that can range between angelic and guttural all in one song, know that you will be moved one way or another. Currently based in Lancaster, PA, Hadassah has added her voice and lyrics to enough different genres – jazz, indie, rock, blues and beyond – that you can just say that she creates “music,” period, and leave it at that.

Her songs wind up being journeys unto themselves, often delicately layered with mini-movements throughout their four and five minute runtimes. With a voice somewhere between Jeff Buckley and Tracy Chapman, Hadassah knows how to guide a haunting melody from her soul to yours.

Counterbalancing her intricate melodies are lyrics that can appeal to anyone with a trackable pulse. Who hasn’t given or received love, or felt a spark within themselves when certain emotions rush in? While not every song in her repertoire is about the comings and goings of love, that feeling remains inextricable when you hear Hadassah sing.

In a club or concert hall, from the cheap seats to VIP, Hadassah will leave her mark by the end of her set, if she hasn’t already by the end of her first song.


Corey O – Volume #3

Love. Why don’t we do that more often?

My name is Corey O but that’s never been too important to me. What I’ve always found important was love. I don’t think we as humans get enough of it. Especially those who are constantly subjected to racial bias, gender bias, age bias etc. etc. I write music with that main theme as the basis for my songs… Love.

I cried writing the song “Fire”. Being from Lancaster Pa. opportunities like this are truly a blessing. Having the chance to examine our society and record my reaction on a vinyl for “Music for Everyone” I was happy and yet full of tears. I was happy that I live in a place where I can even voice my opinions on injustice, but at the same time saddened by the thought of my daughter growing up in a world in which those same injustices are growing too. I cried when I realized it’s projects like this that are a timeless stance on the right side of history. I cried proud to be a combat veteran who’s found a way to cope with PTSD through music. I shed tears for our subjugated past, our turmoiled present and our uncertain future. The crying has since stopped and like any great storm, whether from tears or rain, the sun has shined. And with the sun comes a new day to confront injustice and discrimination. A new day to chase your dreams. A new day to light the FIRE.


Lyncs – Volume #4

American singer/songwriter, producer, and multi-instrumentalist, Jacqueline Hynes, aka Lyncs, brings her own blend of daydream choruses, indie-rock vocals, and star-like textures to the forefront. Her powerful yet wholesome songwriting showcases her strengths in taking a single moment and blowing it up to a heart-string anthem. Since 2018 she’s been telling her story to try and find what connects us all, most recently with her release of “Obvious” which has been featured on American Songwriter and Spotify Editorial Playlist ‘Today’s Singer-Songwriters’


PINK i – Volume #5

Ian Sanchez-Herasme is a proud, colorful, non-binary, queer, and Latinx resident of Lancaster City. Ian is a devout consumer of generic-brand sparkling water who enjoys singing & songwriting, spilling tea at local cafes, and watching educational streaming services. During their free time, Ian enjoys writing and recording music for their music project, “PINK i.”



Joel MakeciVolume #6

Joel Makeci is a Lancaster-based Congolese American singer, songwriter and bandleader. From refugee camps in Tanzania to stages across the United States, Joel has brought his artful blend of rock, rumba and gospel to appreciative audiences everywhere. Joel and the eight-member New Generation Gospel Band put on a high energy show, featuring tight grooves, soaring vocal harmonies and joyful music that transcends cultural and linguistic barriers like only the best music can.


Visual Artists

Gerri McCritty – Volume #1

My inspiration for this painting comes from the many times I have seen and been around less fortunate young boys and girls from all backgrounds and colors.  The one thing that I see they all have in common is a shimmering gold light of hope. 

Visit her Gallery’s website: www.PAVAAgallery.comFacebook or Instagram pages.


Kaya Hobbs – Volume #2

The piece shows 8 figures, 7 facing toward the end of the canvas. Some shouting some with fists raised and one laying in the fetal position. At the end of the line the black and brown figures represent the black and brown people who have fought so hard for queer liberation. All are in front of a flowing banner with the colors of the trans flag as rays of light shine from behind. 

This piece was inspired by every attempt made for queer liberation. It was also inspired by the intersections of the queer experience and how everyone has come together and fought to protect those most vulnerable. The banner waving in the background is to show support for those who are living in their trans experience no matter what that looks like. The rays of light are the hope and empowerment that drives us. This piece is a call to our strength as a community and how important it is to access that and uphold it during times of turmoil and peace. 

Visit Kaya’s INSTAGRAM


Gracie Berry – Volume #3

About the piece: I chose the title Ancestor Tones because Black skin-tones are vibrant biological reflections of nature and the universe. The very cosmology of enslaved Black Afrikans and their descendants is universal wealth. It’s an inherent birth right. The work explores themes of Afrofuturism connecting past, present and future. I think of Frederick Douglass as an Afrofuturist because he paved the way through literature and education for many Black people of his time. Also, he was the most photographed human being of his time, even more than the president, so he was a visible example of what it looked like to reimagine a realty or futures. What it looked like to control their own narratives and Afrodiasporic experiences. Fast forward 200 plus years and he’s still inspiring many generations. For example, Amanda Gorman, the youngest Black inaugural poet in American history, credits Frederick Douglass with teaching her how to use technology for social justice. She highlights how intentional he was about capturing a counter-image to the Black American stereotypes at the time and how she mirrors similar themes in her poetry.


Keisha Finnie – Volume #4

My inspiration comes from simply living life and being a woman of color. I’ve used my art to express my thoughts and feelings around self-identity, being black is a big part of that because the world never forgets to remind me. My art comes from a combination of my love for nature, vibrant color, texture and the female form. It’s a reflection of myself while connecting the viewer to my perspective of the world.

Art has been something I have been drawn to for as long as I can remember. From my first art class in kindergarten, to still creating every chance I get today. I have nothing but love for my craft; I constantly aim to master as many forms and mediums of art as possible. It’s all about growth. Thank you for being on this journey with me.

Peace,


Eric Tonzola – Volume #5

Lancaster based artist and designer, Eric Tonzola, has been honing his skills as a multidisciplinary artist. Originally a professional graphic designer, Eric has broadened his vision to create works with many mediums. Blending 13 plus years of graphic designer skills and painting and illustrating, Eric tends to lean towards the whimsical and conceptual styles of surrealism, pop and abstract art. In his current works Eric has challenged himself by using different techniques and ideas such as: limited color palettes, the use of fluorescent pigments, and optical illusions.

Most passionate about painting Eric is currently a resident artist at Switchboard Studios & Gallery in Columbia, PA where you can often find him.


Mu Kaw and Day Day – Volume #6

The painting was inspired by Habecker Mennonite Church, where people from different cultures (Burmese, Karen, English) come together to celebrate their love for one another and God. Day Day and Mu Kaw are no strangers to working for Music For Everyone. They painted CWS’ 2021 entry to the MFE Keys for the City Piano, in a design that demonstrated how music can connect people from all cultures. 


Poets

Le Hinton – Volume #1

Poet, teacher, lecturer, Le Hinton is the author of six poetry collections including, the Language of Moisture and Light (Iris G. Press, 2014) and most recently, Sing Silence (Iris G. Press, 2018). His work has been widely published and can be found in The Best American Poetry 2014the Baltimore Review, the Pittsburgh Poetry Reviewthe Summerset Reviewthe Skinny Poetry Journal, and in many other publications. His poem “Epidemic” was honored by The Pennsylvania Center for the Book and “Our Ballpark” can be found outside Clipper Magazine Stadium in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, incorporated into Derek Parker’s sculpture Common Thread.

​His current collection, Sing Silence (formerly A Chorus for Cotton), was a finalist for “The Best Prize for People of Color” from Big Lucks and an honorable mention for the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize. 

Visit Le’s website: www.LeHinton.com


Brian Graves – Volume #2

This poem was inspired by Tim O’Brien’s short story “The Things They Carried.” The story is about American soldiers fighting on the ground in Vietnam and the things, both tangible (malaria tablets, weapons, tents, pictures, and mementos), and intangible (memories, love, fear, sadness, and regrets) that they carried with them every day. As a Black, Muslim, immigrant living in America, I “carry” things too, both tangible (identification, receipts, and a buffer space), and intangible (fear, memories, caution, and anger). It is set in one of those big warehouse stores, think Walmart, and how on a daily grocery run, my life, although not as dangerous, resembles soldiers on the frontline.


Rashid Noah – Volume #3

This poem was inspired by Tim O’Brien’s short story “The Things They Carried.” The story is about American soldiers fighting on the ground in Vietnam and the things, both tangible (malaria tablets, weapons, tents, pictures, and mementos), and intangible (memories, love, fear, sadness, and regrets) that they carried with them every day. As a Black, Muslim, immigrant living in America, I “carry” things too, both tangible (identification, receipts, and a buffer space), and intangible (fear, memories, caution, and anger). It is set in one of those big warehouse stores, think Walmart, and how on a daily grocery run, my life, although not as dangerous, resembles soldiers on the frontline.


Thunda Khatt – Volume #4

She’s been word bending for as long as she’s been able to hold a pen but has only referred to herself as a poet since taking a creative writing class during her senior year of high school. She credits the teacher of that class with igniting her pen after introducing her to Russel Simmons’ Def Poetry Jam. Through her poetry, Thunda Khatt tells the stories of the unheard. She lifts her voice to amplify those before her that could not speak and encourages those after her to never forget the power of their voice.

Visit Thunda Khatt’s WEBSITE


Marianne Colon – Volume #4

My name is Marianne. I am a Latina born in Flint, Michigan and raised in Lancaster. I learned from a really early age that writing was my calling. I was about 8 years old when I started journaling and writing all my thoughts down. I had an extremely difficult upbringing which is what influences my poetry. My main focus is writing about topics that people do not like to talk about. I write about things that are uncomfortable for people to hear, I bring out the skeletons in the closet. My voice was always silenced when I was younger which is what pushed me to write everything down and think deeply on human choices.


Dr. Amanda Kemp – Volume #5

Also known as Aminata Sol Plant Walker Fire Woman, Amanda Kemp is the founder and leader of Racial Justice from the Heart and the author of the Amazon best-seller Stop Being Afraid: 5 Steps to Transform your Conversations about Racism. She had a spiritual awakening in 2021 when she received the message to stop everything and that the trees on her land wanted to adopt her. Over the course of a two-year learning journey, she has been working with deeper truths underneath social justice, journeying with plants and fungi, and subsequently received her new names from an ancestor. She has since integrated the wisdom from trees into her Mother Tree Network podcast and community and continues her deep apprenticeship to the Earth and the feminine divine.


Dr. Michael Jamanis – Volume #5

Dr. Michael Jamanis is an award-winning violinist, educator, composer and activist who has performed in concert halls all over the world. Michael’s focus has shifted due to his desire to bring musical opportunities to under-resourced young people, and to broaden his own musical vocabulary. Additionally, he has become a Racial Justice from the Heart facilitator and is founder of The Jamanis Project.

Michael also serves as the Director of Music in the Schools, an educational program sponsored by Music for Everyone. The program serves approximately 400 students weekly providing individual lessons, classes, workshops and guest artists. He is also a senior adjunct professor at Franklin and Marshall College, where he teaches a private studio of violin and viola students and coaches chamber music ensembles.


Audrey Lopez – Volume #6

 Originally from Peru, Audrey Lopez moved to the U.S. in 2001. She was undocumented for 18 years and found her voice in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She now contributes to making host communities more welcoming towards migrants across Latin America and the Caribbean.